A Set of 8 George III Kings Pattern Table Knives, London 1813 by Moses Brent
A Set of 8 George III Kings Pattern Table Knives, London 1813 by Moses Brent
A Set of 8 George III Kings Pattern Table Knives, London 1813 by Moses Brent
A Set of 8 George III Kings Pattern Table Knives, London 1813 by Moses Brent
A Set of 8 George III Kings Pattern Table Knives, London 1813 by Moses Brent
A Set of 8 George III Kings Pattern Table Knives, London 1813 by Moses Brent
A Set of 8 George III Kings Pattern Table Knives, London 1813 by Moses Brent
A Set of 8 George III Kings Pattern Table Knives, London 1813 by Moses Brent
A Set of 8 George III Kings Pattern Table Knives, London 1813 by Moses Brent
A Set of 8 George III Kings Pattern Table Knives, London 1813 by Moses Brent

A Set of 8 George III Kings Pattern Table Knives, London 1813 by Moses Brent

Regular price £750.00

A Set of 8 George III Kings Pattern Table Knives, London 1813 by Moses Brent

A Set of 8 George III Kings Pattern table knives, with the original blades and engraved to the handle with a crest of a dragon.

Hallmarked for London 1813 by the specialist knife make Moses Brent. The blades are marked for by Harrison Bros & Howsen, cutlers to Her Majesty or A & N C S L.

 

The knives are in very fine condition with no repairs of splits. Of a good gauge and patina with very good definition to the pattern.

 

Handle length: 11.5cm or 4.5”

Handle diameter: 2cm or 1”

Overall length: 28cm or 11”

 

Moses Brent

Moses Brent was apprenticed to Dru Drury knife handle maker, 6th July 1763. Free 7th November 1770. His first mark was entered as haftmaker, 11th July 1775. His eighteenth mark was entered on the 18th February 1817, and from the large number of his mark entries and the frequency they are met on knifehafts and blades of his working period, it is obvious that Brent had a virtual monopoly as specialist in this field to the retail trade of his day. His knives are found accompanying ‘flat ware’ made by Eley, Fern & Chawner as supplied to Rundell, Bridge & Rundell for all their best clients. As such he can be considered amongst the finest knife maker of the period.

 

Kings Pattern

This is one of the most popular of all the flatware patterns, dating principally from the early nineteenth century, although occasionally, since it is based on French eighteenth century designs, earlier examples may be found. This pattern was very popular and therefore large quantities were produced throughout the nineteenth century, and it is still being produced today. This makes it very collectable as it is easier to get individual pieces to complete canteens.